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The Truth Behind Millennial Job Hopping, According to Study

It’s no surprise millennials have the reputation to be job hoppers. In turn, employee retention for companies has become a nightmare. But what if this job hopping phenomenon is not to be blamed all to millennials? What if employers themselves are failing at creating a workplace that will meet the needs and acceptable requirements of today’s generation?

Here are some truths behind the job hopping scheme of millennials, according to study:

Millennials don’t have the opportunity to showcase what they’re good at

According to a 2016 millennial survey of Deloitte, only 62% of 7,700 millennials from around the world agreed that they were able to maximize their skills in their respective jobs. Truth be told, activating what the employee is good at gives them a better appreciation and connection with the job they do.

Most entry-level or lower-ranked jobs don’t offer the opportunity for employees to make use of their skills and potential. Millennials need to be challenged and their ideas should be aroused on variety of projects. In turn, they will feel their value and stay engaged—an issue that is pressing with employees of any age.

Lack of career advancement in the company

A 2016 employee engagement survey led by Quantum Workplace (an employee engagement software company) showed more than half a million working professionals whose age is between 26 and 35 are the least engaged group. The said study also revealed that career advancement opportunities were one of the top factors of millennial engagement.

This report suggests that one of the main causes why this generation is disengaged at work is because they are not having the chance to professionally advance themselves. As a result, this drives them to look for another job thus, taking the route to job-hopping cycle. Some surveys in Asia similarly found this trend. For example, the MRIC Group 2015 Talent Survey in Singapore showed that even though only 14% of professionals change jobs in the previous year, about 33% say they are considering jobs in the current year. While in its nearby country, Malaysia, about 37.3% of millennials say they would leave their jobs when there’s no opportunity for promotion, according to a Vulcan Post poll.

Hard work is left unrecognized

In a 2015 Leadership IQ Survey, only 33% out of 3,000 employees under the age of 30 were convinced that their performance was at the right level. Lack of feedback and recognition that makes young professionals feel unsure about how well they are doing. That lack of communication can come across to have less importance in the organization. Without such attention, it becomes easier for them to be appreciated somewhere else.